Ink Spot: J. Herbin 1670 Caroube de Chypre


J. Herbin’s popular 1670 line of inks has been an eye-catcher since my entry into the hobby. Packaged in beautiful (yet difficult to fill from) cubical glass bottles, and accented with a wax-dipped cap and wax seal, this was among the first line of what I call “glitter inks,” or inks that feature ultra-fine particulate matter to give a lovely glittering quality to the ink when it dries. The line currently consists of Rouge Hematite (a bright red with gold sparkles), Bleu Ocean (blue with silver sparkles), Stormy Grey (grey with gold sparkles), and last years heart-stopper, Emerald of Chivor (a lovely dark teal with incredible red sheen and gold sparkles.)  The new ink for 2016 is J. Herbin’s Caroube de Chypre.

Caroube de Chypre is a chocolate brown ink with a slight reddish undertone that features a bit of a green/purple sheen and gold sparkles. It’s a color that I find that I like a lot. It’s not as attention grabbing as last year’s Emerald of Chivor, but still has a lot of personality. As someone who appreciates a nice brown ink, I’ve been pretty impressed with this one. It has some unusual characteristics (longer dry times on paper that usually has short dry times and vice verse), but it behaves quite well on a whole variety of papers and a lot of pens as well.

You can watch the video above for examples of the ink in action, or check out the photo gallery below.

A bottle of this ink was provided free of charge for review by Exaclair, the US distributor for J. Herbin. The remainder of the ink not used for this review will be included as part of a prize package for a future giveaway on Penhabit.com. No additional compensation was provided. All opinions expressed herein are my own.

  • MKR

    This ink looks more attractive (to my particular taste—my favorite browns are Stipula Sepia and Mont Blanc Toffee) in the bottle than it does on paper: deep, rich brown in the bottle versus pinkish brown on paper.

    I’m a sucker for J. Herbin inks in general, and I’ve tried a couple of the glitter inks (red and gray), but I have been disappointed at how rarely one gets any visible glitter on to the page. It’s one thing to have to agitate one’s pen before one starts to write with it, but it seems to be necessary to do so repeatedly during a writing session if one wants to get the glitter to come through. And, of course, I don’t trust that stuff to rinse out of the pen entirely!

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